How to Transition to a New Job

9 12 2009

Harvey Goodman speaks at MITSVA December 8, 2009 on How to Transition to a New Job (Photos by Sheree R. Curry)

early a dozen people braved the heavy snow fall that blew across the Twin Cities on Tuesday to hear Harvey Goodman speak on “How to Transition to a New Job.”

The free seminar, held at MITSVA, 1712 Hopkins Crossroad, Minnetonka, is one of several that are held most Tuesday evenings.

Mr. Goodman discussed how networking is key to finding a new job and that networking should move beyond social tools and back to the basics: face-to-face networking.

More >>

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements




How Credit Rating Can Affect Your Ability to Get a Job

3 12 2009

A Facebook fan of the Money Coach had heard that a bad credit rating could keep him from getting a job. He wanted to verify whether this is true and wanted to know where he find out about his credit rating. Read more >>





Even as Layoffs Persist, Some Good Jobs Go Unfilled

5 10 2009

By CHRISTOPHER LEONARD, AP Business Writer – Sun Oct 4, 3:53 pm ET
Job training seminarIn a brutal job market, here’s a task that might sound easy: Fill jobs in nursing, engineering and energy research that pay $55,000 to $60,000, plus benefits.
Yet even with 15 million people hunting for work, even with the unemployment rate nearing 10 percent, some employers can’t find enough qualified people for good-paying career jobs.
Ask Steve Jones, a hospital recruiter in Indianapolis who’s struggling to find qualified nurses, pharmacists and MRI technicians. Or Ed Baker, who’s looking to hire at a U.S. Energy Department research lab in Richland, Wash., for $60,000 each.
Economists say the main problem is a mismatch between available work and people qualified to do it. Millions of jobs with attractive pay and benefits that once drew legions of workers to the auto industry, construction, Wall Street and other sectors are gone, probably for good. And those who lost those jobs generally lack the right experience for new positions popping up in health care, energy and engineering.
Many of these specialized jobs were hard to fill even before the recession. But during downturns, recruiters tend to become even choosier, less willing to take financial risks on untested workers.
The mismatch between job opening and job seeker is likely to persist even as the economy strengthens and begins to add jobs. It also will make it harder for the unemployment rate, now at 9.8 percent, to drop down to a healthier level.  Read More…
___
Associated Press reporters Christopher S. Rugaber in Washington and Mike Smith in Indianapolis contributed to this report.